Magufulification: Concept That Will Define Africa's Future and the Man Who Makes Things Happen

Magufulification: Concept That Will Define Africa's Future and the Man Who Makes Things Happen

Wednesday, 30 October 2019

THE GREAT NEWS OF THE WEEK: “COURT OF APPEAL CONFIRMS 18 YEARS AS OFFICIAL MARRIAGE AGE” . . . ALLELUIA


Image result for photos of msekwaTo  a  presumably  large  number  of  stakeholders,  including  myself,  and  specifically, to  the  Law  Reform  Commission  of  Tanzania;  the  decision  by  the Court  of  Appeal  of  Tanzania,  which  was  made  on  Wednesday  last  week,  the 23rd  day  of  October, 2019;  was  not  only   very  great news,  but  was  also  most  welcome  news.  In my  case,  and  that  of  the  Law  Reform  Commission  of  Tanzania,  our  joy  and  satisfaction  arises  from  the  fact  that  our  past  endeavours   to  have  these  same  amendments   made  to  the  Law  of  Marriage  Act of  1971, which  had  apparently  failed;   have  now,  at  last,  borne   fruit.   Thus, our  efforts  have  been  amply  rewarded.                
The relevant story  is  that  this  particular matter  had  seriously   engaged  our  minds  as  a  Commission,  way  back  in  the  early  1990s,  but   without  success;   as  is  succinctly  narrated  here  below. 
The   untold story  of  the  Tanzania  Law  Reform  Commission.
In 2013, The  Law  Reform  Commission of  Tanzania  celebrated  its  30th  anniversary  of  service to  the  public,  after  it  was  established  in  1983.  I personally had  the  very  good  fortune  of  being  a  member  of  that professional  body,  continuously  for  the  whole  of  that  period;   thanks  to  repeated  ‘mandate  renewal’  by  the  appointing  authorities.  Thus, in the  capacity  of  “senior  member”  thereof,  I  was  invited  to  give  the  ‘key note  address’   on  that  occasion;  an  opportunity  which  I  delightfully    grabbed.   In my  carefully  prepared  speech,   I  expressed  what  I  described  as   the    “disappointments” ,  which  the  Commission  had  suffered,  as  a result  of  the  Government’s  failure  to  take  action  on  many  of its  recommendations.  And, in  relation  to  its recommendations contained   in  its  1994  “ Report  of  the  Law  Reform  Commission  on  the Law  of  Marriage  Act, 1971”.  This is  precisely  what  I  said:-
“The other  disappointment  has  been  that,  in  many  cases,  no  action  whatsoever,   has  been  taken by  the  Government  on   the  Commission’s  recommendations,  including   those which  were  made regarding   the  Law  of  Marriage  Act, 1971.   The  facts  of  which,  are  as  follows:   Our  Commission, having  carefully  appraised  the numerous   complaints  that  were  being  expressed  in  various  seminars  and  workshops  which  the  Commission  had  organized  in  preparation  for  its    Report  thereon,  specifically  regarding  the  tender  age  at  which  girls  are  allowed  by  that  law  to  get  married.    However,  In  making  its  relevant  recommendations,  the  Commission  was  mindful  of  the  primary  purpose  for  which   the  enactment  of  that legislation  was  intended  to  achieve;  which  was ‘to  reform  that  law  in order  to  properly  align  it with the  aspirations  of  the  then  ruling  party (TANU),  of  providing  equal  statutory  recognition  to  all  marriages however  celebrated:   be  they   Christian,  Islamic,  Civil,  or  Customary’.
            Nevertheless,  we  pointed  out,  that  since  the  Commission  was  reviewing  that  legislation  after  it  had  been  in  operation  for  a  whole  twenty  years;   and also  in  view  of  the  social  and  cultural  changes  and  developments  that  had  taken  place  in  our  society  during  those  two  decades,  some  of  its  provisions  were, obviously,  in  dire  need of  modification;  such  as  sections  13(1)  and  13(2)  thereof,  which  make discriminating   provision  for a  different  minimum  age of  marriage  for  males  and  females,   with  females  being  allowed  to  get  married  at  the  tender  age  of  14  and  15  years  with  parental  consent;   but  retaining  18  years  for  males.   Hence, In view  of  that  glaring discrimination, the  Commission   had  recommended  that  appropriate  amendments  be  made to  raise  the  minimum  marriage  age  even   for  females,   to  18  years;   which  is  the  legal  age  of  majority.  But, unfortunately, no  such  amendments  have  been  made  so  far;   presumably  for  some  good  reasons  on  the  part  of  the  Government”.    
No hope  of action  from  the Government.
However, in  making  those  remarks,  I  still  had  no   hope,  nor  expectation,  that  the  Government  would  take  any  action  as  a  result  of  those  remarks.   Based  on  my  experience in  Government  practices  and  procedures,  I  was  fully  aware  that  remarks  made  in  a  speech  delivered  at  a private  function,  organized  by  the  relevant   stakeholders   in  order  to  celebrate  something  that  may be  important  to  them;   cannot  possibly  lead  to  action  being  taken   by  the  Government.                              
I  was  aware,  for  example,  that  such  speeches  at  private  functions,  are  totally  different from  those   which  are  made  by  MPs  inside  Parliament  House,  in  the  form  of  ‘complaints’   directed   at  Ministers  present  therein,  with  the  full  expectation   that  the  Ministers  concerned  are  conventionally  bound  to   respond  promptly  to  any  complaints  raised  in  MPs  speeches.                        
Thus,  with  a  clear  understanding  of  that  material  difference,  even  though  the  Minister  responsible  for  Legal  Affairs  had  been  invited   and  was  present  at  that  function;    I strategically  chose  to describe  my  remarks  as  the  Commission’s  “disappointments”,  rather  than  “complaints”;  as  a  polite  way  of  drawing  the  Government’s   attention  to  its  specified  shortcomings,  or  failures.
I  had   strategically   designed  my  remarks  in  the  likeness  of  the speeches   normally  delivered  by  the   actors  on  the  stage,   such  as  those  in the  Plays  written  by  that  famous  English  Playwright  William  Shakespeare’s   Plays,  and  specifically   those  that  were  purposefully  selected  by  Mwalimu  Julius  Nyerere  for  translation  into  Kiswahili  as  “ Julius  Kaizari”    and  Mapepari  wa  Venisi”.        They may  contain   valuable  lessons,   but  they  can only  deliver  such  message to  the  relevant  audience,  without  expecting  any  immediate  response  from  that  audience,  other  than  the  sporadic  applause. Hence, similarly in  my  case,  despite  the  factor  of  the  Minister responsible  for  Legal  Affairs  being  present,   I  actually  expected  no  immediate  response  from  the  Government.   And, indeed, as expected,  none  whatsoever   came  out.
             Enter the judiciary.
The court  battle  started  when  a  petition  was  filed  at  the  High  Court  by  a  girls’  rights  advocate,  one  Rebeca  Gyumi,  Director  and  Founder  of Msichana  Initiative.  Her  petition  subsequently   went  through  the  normal  court  process  of  hearing,  and  eventual  determination;   after  which,  the  High  Court  panel  of  three  Judges  made  its  decision  on  July  8th, 2016;  which  nullified  sections  13  and  17  of  the  Law  of  Marriage  Act,  that  had  allowed  girls  at  the  tender  age  of  14  and  15  years,  to  get  married   ‘with  parental  consent’.  The  High  Court   ruled  that  marriage under  the  age  of  18  years  was  illegal;   and, consequently,   declared  those  provisions  unconstitutional;  giving  the  Government   one  year  from  the  date  of  that  ruling,  to  introduce  appropriate  legislative  amendments,  which  would  put  18  years  as  the  minimum  age  for  marriage  for  both  males  and  females.                                   
This decision  was,  indeed,  entirely  reasonable,  considering  the  new  developments  that  had  taken  place,  whereby  the  Government  itself  had  started  taking   measures  to  criminalize any  attempts  by  anyone,   to  marry  school- age  children;  plus  all  those  persons  who   impregnated   any  Primary,  or  Secondary  School  girl.                                           
Surprisingly however,  in  a  move  that  attracted   fair  criticism from a  section  of the  general  public, the Government,  through  the  Attorney  General,  appealed  against  the  High  Court  ruling.                         
The appeal  case  had been  dragging  on  until  last week,  when  the Court  of  Appeal  sitting   in  Dar es  Salaam,  upheld  the  earlier  High  Court  ruling regarding  the  constitutionality   of  child  marriages.
          The  Court  of  Appeal   dismissed  the  appeal  lodged  by  the  Attorney  General   in  a  vain  attempt    to  fault  the  High  Court  ruling,   confirmed  the  High  Court’s  decision,  and   annulled  those  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Marriage  Act ,  which  had  allowed  the   marriage  of  girls  below  the  age  of  18  years.                     
            This landmark  decision,  sets  the  statutory  marriage  age  for  both  males  at  females,  at  18  years. The Court  of  Appeal,  the  country’s  highest  temple of  justice,  said  thus:-  “ We  find  and  hold  that  the  entire  appeal  has  no  merit.  The appellant  was  supposed  to  abide  by  the order  of  the  High  Court,   to  cause  amendments  to be  made  to  the Law  of  Marriage  Act  as  directed  by  the  High  Court.    Having so  stated,  we  dismiss the  appeal  in  its  entirety,  with  no  order  as  to  costs”. Absolutely   fabulous!   “Roma locuta,  causa  finita”.
            “Great minds   think  alike”.
Looked at  from  another  perspective,  the  Court  of  Appeal  decision  has  proved  the efficacy  of  the  dictum,  which  is  attributed  to  an  anonymous   wise  guru, namely   that  “great  minds  always  think  alike”.    In  their  judgment  of  last  week,  the  Court  of Appeal  Justices  also  pointed  out  that  “while  the  Law  of  Marriage  Act  may  have  been  enacted  with  good  intentions  in  1971; its  intention  is  no  longer  relevant,  because  the  effect  of the  Act’s   provisions  that are  being  challenged,  amounts  to   discrimination  against  girls,  by  depriving  them  of  certain  vital  opportunities.                                            
This is  exactly  the  argument  that  had  been  advanced  by  the  Law  Reform  Commission  in  its  1994  recommendations,  in  which  it  strongly  urged   the  Government  to  make  those  same   amendments  to  this  law.   This serves  as  testimony  to  the  fact  that  those  ‘learned  brothers  and  sisters’  in  both  the  Law  Reform  Commission,  and  in the  Judiciary (the  High  Court  and  the  Court  of  Appeal),  were  clearly  “thinking  alike”,   to  the  great  disadvantage  of  their  counterparts   in  the  Government!  
“Give credit where  credit  is  due”
At this juncture, I feel  I  should   do  the  needful  and  “give  credit  where  credit  is  due”.                Kudos to Ms  Rebeca  Gyumi   for  her  bold  initiative  in  taking  this  matter  to  court;  and  achieving  such a  pleasant  outcome.     She   had apparently followed   Mr.  Justice Samatta’s   general  advice to  the  public,  that  the  “the  doors  to  the  temple  of  justice  are always   wide  open  and  welcoming  to  anyone  who  feels  aggrieved  by  a  contravention  of  the  law”.      
Ms Rebeca  Gyumi,  a  prominent  child  rights  activist,  must  have  felt  aggrieved  by  the  widespread  injustices  caused  to  large  numbers  of  Tanzania  girls,  through   wanton  child  marriages  and    pregnancies.  She  therefore  decided  to  “take  the  bull by  the  horns”  by  going  to  that  venerable   temple   to  seek  justice.                                                                “Constitutional  litigation”   has  generally   not  been  a  common  feature  of public  litigation  in Tanzania.   Although  the  enterprising  Professor  Issa  Shivji,  of  the  University  of  Dar es Salaam,  introduced  the  mood  for  anticipating  an  ‘explosion’  of  constitutional  litigation  cases  being  filed  in  our  courts,  when ,  in  his  inaugural  professorial  the  list  of  “Union  matters”  saying  that  ‘these  were   justiciable  issues  that  could be  impugned  in  the  domestic  courts  on  the  ground  of    repugnancy’.   But  the  matter  actually  ended  there,  and  the  anticipated  ‘flood  of  constitutional  litigation’  did  not   materialize.    Ms  Rebeca  Gyumi   therefore  richly  deserves   commendation  for  her  pathfinder  initiative  in  relation  thereto. 
“Action  speaks  louder  than  words”.
The  expression  that  “action  speaks  louder  than  words”  is  a  fairly  familiar  English  language  proverb.  The  efficacy  of  this  proverb  has  been  proved   ‘beyond  reasonable  doubt’  in   Ms  Rebeca   Gyumi’s  successful   litigation  against  the  Government.   Many  other  self-declared  activists  have  expressed  their  concerns  at  the  glaring  injustices  being  perpetrated against  the  girl  child,  but  they  all ended  up  much  like  the  speeches  by  actors  on  the  entertainment  stage:  they  delivered  the  message,  but  with  no  tangible  results  being  obtained.
On  the  contrary,  Rebeca  Gyumi’s    court  action,  and  specially  the  huge  society  benefits    accruing  from  it  as  a  result  of  the  Court of  Appeal’s  landmark  decision,  has  bestowed  lasting  peace on  the  minds  of  the  girls  who  were  victims  of  the  offending  provisions  of  the  Law  of  Marriage  Act,  1971,   that  have  now  been  nullified,  and  are  no  longer  part  of  that  law.  Alleluia.
Piomsekwa @gmail.com/0754767576
Source: Daily News and Cde Msekwa Himself.