Epistle to Afrophobic South Africa

Epistle to Afrophobic South Africa

Saturday, 3 December 2022

CORRUPTION IN THE 2022 CCM ELECTIONS : THE WAR THAT CANNOT BE WON?

       


In  the  course  of  last  week,  as  the  CCM  general  elections  (and  those  of  its  affiliated  Organizations)   were proceeding  at  the  Regional  level;  the  party’s  Secretary  General  Daniel  Chongolo,  announced  the  nullification  of  the  results  in  several  locations,  for  the  reason  that  electoral  corruption  had  taken  place  in  those  areas.   “CCM  smells  rat  (sic)  in  four  Regions’  intra-part  polls”   said   the  DAILY  NEWS   of  Tuesday,  November  22nd,  2022  on  its  front  page.        
             But   many  of  us  do  know,   that  this  corruption  scourge  has  been  with  us  all  the  time,  and  has  been   taking  place  in  practically   every  such  election.   Corruption  appears  to  have  defied  all  the  efforts  to  fight  against  it,  as  evidenced  by  the  numerous  complaints  and  election  petitions  that  have  been  raised  in   respect  of  every  such  election.  Hence  the  question:   is  this   the  kind  of  war  that  cannot  be  won?
        I  was  reading  the  book  of  prayers,  when  I  came  across  the  following  beautiful  verse: “Oh  God,  give  me  the  courage  to  know  the  things  I  can  change; The  sagacity  to  know  the  things  I  cannot  change; And  the  wisdom  to  know   the  difference”.  The  lesson  of  this  prayer  appears  to  be  that  “there  are   things  that  “we  cannot    change”;  and  the  presence  of corruption  in  politics,  particularly  electoral corruption,   seems  to  be  one  of  those  things   that  we  cannot  change  by  winning  the  war  against   it.  
Why  this  war  cannot  be  won. 
The  war  against  corruption  was  first   declared  by  Mwalimu  Julius  Nyerere,   in   his  speech  to  the  colonial  Legislative  Council,  delivered  on  17th  May,  1960;   in  which  he   said  the  following:-“Mr.  Speaker,  there  is  one  other  enemy  which  must  be  added  to  the  three  already  declared  ‘people’s   enemies’  of  poverty,  ignorance  and  disease.   This   enemy,   is  corruption. 
        I  think   corruption  must  be  treated  with  ruthlessness   because,  in  my  opinion,  corruption  and  bribery  are  greater  enemies  to  the  welfare  of  the  people  during  peace  time,  than  war  is  during  war  time.  I  believe  that  corruption  in  a  country  should  be  treated  in  almost  the  same  way  as  treasoThereafter  when   TANUs   creed  was  crafted,   it  included  a  declaration   that  “ corruption  is  an  enemy  of  justice”,  and  enjoins  every  party  member  to  promise,  in  a solemn  oath,  that    he  or  she  “will  never  give,  or  receive  bribes”.   
             And  even   at  society  level,  corruption  is  roundly  condemned  as  an  unmitigated  evil.  Plus,  according  to  the  country’s  laws,   corruption  is  a  criminal  offence.   In April  1971,  the  Parliament  of  the  United  Republic  enacted  the  Prevention  of  corruption  Act  (no.  6  of  1971)  which  defined  the  full  range  of  “corrupt  transactions”,  and  imposed  severe  penalties  on  those  who  would  be  found  guilty  of  an  offence  under  this  Act. The  Act  was  amended  in  1974,  to  enable   the  President   to  establish   an  anti-corruption  body,  which  is  the  current  ‘Prevention  and  Control  of  Corruption Bureau (PCCB).        
        But  still,  despite  all  these  efforts  and  devices  to  combat  corruption,  it  still  continues  to  prosper  in  our  institutions  of  governance,  including   CCM,  the  ruling  party.   It   thus   seems   pretty   obvious,   that   the  war  against  corruption  cannot  be  won.   But   why? There   must  be  a  variety  of  reasons  for  this  failure.  It,  would  appear  that  this  is   one  of  those  things   that   ‘we  cannot  change”,  as  advised  in  the  prayer  verse  quoted  above.                          
        My  assertion  is  based  on  the  argument  that  since   ‘we  cannot  change’ the  situation  regarding  the  other  three  enemies  of  poverty,  ignorance  and  disease;  and  that   all  we  can  do  is  to  continue  fighting   relentlessly against  them;  but   with  no  hope  of  eliminating  them completely;  thus  leavn". ing  it  to  every  generation   to  continue  the  fight,   to  the  best  of  its  ability  in  terms  of  resources.    The  same  argument   seems   to  apply  to  the  enemy  of ‘corruption’.  Every  generation  will  similarly  have  to  continue  the  fight,  to  the  best  of  its  ability.
             Other  mundane  reasons   that  could  be  considered  to  be  remotely   relevant,  including  propositions   such  as  that  which  was  advanced  by  the   celebrated  Historian  Edward  Gibbon, (1737 -1794)  who,  in  his  classical  work  titled  The  Decline  and  Fall of  the Roman  Empire,  described  ‘corruption’  as  “the  most  infallible  symptom  of  constitutional  liberty”.  His  statement  was  interpreted  to  mean  that  the  freedom  of  the  individual  includes  hi  freedom  to  be  corrupt! Hence,   ‘aluta  continua’  (the  struggle  continues).
            We  have  all witnessed  the  fact  that   the  problem  of  corruption,  especially  electoral  corruption  has  continued  unabated.    In  my  presentation  in  this  column  in  August  2020;  when   I  was  writing  in  preparation  for  that   year’s  general  election,   I   also  referred  to  this  matter  of  electoral   corruption,   wherein  I  said  that   any  amount  of  brain-racking  about  a  way  out  of  this  problem,   has  always  seemed   to end  up  in  frustrating  futility;  and  that  despite the  general  public ‘s  awareness   of  the  evils  of   corruption,  plus   the  numerous  complaints  against  it  that  are  often  raised;  when  the  argument   reaches  the  point  of  suggesting  a  viable  solution  to  the  problem,  the  stakeholders  tend  to  run  out  of  ideas,  as   everyone  seems  to  expect  the  government  alone  to  do  all  the  fighting  against  this  menacing   corruption.                            
             The  government,  of  course,  has  a  binding  obligation  to  take  the  necessary  actions  but,  under  the  ‘rule  of  law’  principle,   the  government  can  fight  corruption  only  through  the  courts  of  law,  and  this  rote  has  its  win  obstacles,  which  are  caused  by  factors  that  are  inherent  in  the  established  practice  and  procedure  of  the  courts;  such  as  their  reliance  on  procedural  technicalities,  which  the  defense  counsel  can  use   to  save  their  clients  from  conviction.                  
        And  there  is  yet  another    obstacle,  that  is  however  perfectly  justified,  namely,  the  requirement  to  produce  evidence  that  will  satisfy  the  court  beyond  reasonable doubt,  in  order  to  secure  a  conviction. This  is  indeed   justified  and  necessary  in  the  dispensation  of  justice;  but  it  creates  an  impediment  to  the  prosecution  in  electoral  corruption  cases;  which  is  caused  by   three  factors:  (i)  the  secrecy  that  normally  surrounds  such  corrupt  transactions;  obviously  for  fear  of  being  detected; (ii)  the  mutual  willingness  by  the  parties  involved,  which  is  akin  to  the  “willing  seller/willing  buyer”   business  principle,  which  is  applicable  in   lawful  commercial   business   transactions;  whereby  the  seller  of  a  given  product  or   item  is  willing  and  happy  to sell  his  item,  and  the  buyer  is  equally  willing  and  happy  to  buy  the  same;  and    (iii)  the  sheer   love  of  money.  For,  as  the  Holy  Bible  says: “the  love  of  money  is  the  root  of  all  evil”.                                  
         Corruption  money  is   certainly  easy  money  to  obtain,  and  therefore  a  great  attraction  to  the  voters,   who  are  the  targeted  recipients  of  such  money;  which  adds  to  the  difficulties  of  fighting  electoral  corruption.    But  that  is  how  the  Justice  system  operates;  and  this  reminds  me  of  the  saying  that  is  attributed  to  an  ancient  Athenian statesman  called  Solon,  who   is  on  record  as  having  said  this:-“Laws  are  like  spiders  webs.  If  some  poor  weak  creature  comes  up  against  them,  it  is  caught.  But  a  bigger  one  can  break  though  and  get  away”.
However,   the  fight  against  corruption  must  continue.
          But  that   is  not  to  say  that  we  should  surrender  and  give  up  the  fight.   The  books  of  authority  on  this  subject  assert  that  “corruption  is  like  a  virus,  which  is  always  around  to  infect  a  political  system  and  make  it  sick  anywhere  in  the  world.   And  very  much  like the  human  body,  political  systems  are  also  capable  of  developing  their  own  immune  systems  that  can  automatically  fight  and  resist  the  corruption  virus”.  
         The  said  books  further  assert   that  “the  degree  of  corruption  prevailing  in  any  one  political  society  largely  depends  on  either  the  strength,  or  the  efficiency,  of  its  immune  system.  In  a  democratic  polity, a  strong  and  vigilant  public  opinion  is  the  built-in  immune  system   which  resists  and  restricts   the  onslaught  of  viruses  like  corruption”.    
        In  essence,   this  assertion enjoins  every  leader  in  their  respective  areas  of  responsibility,  to  take  on  the  responsibility  of  creating  this  desired  “strong   and  sustainable  public  opinion”  that  will  resist  and  restrict  the  continued  onslaught  of   the  corruption  virus.      
        Indeed,  such  initiatives  will  be    implementing   the  advise  given  by  Edmund  Burke (1729 – 1797)  that   “for  any  evil to  triumph,  it  is  only  necessary  for  the  good  man  to  do  nothing  about  it”.  Hence,  let  every  leader  in  our  political  society  be  that  “good  man”  who  refuses  to  do  nothing  about  corruption,  and  instead,  actively  undertakes  to  do  something  about  it,   in  support  of  the  national   efforts  in  curbing  corruption. 
CCM’s   record   of   efforts   to  combat  corruption. 
The  nullification  of  results  announced  by  CCM  Secretary  General  is  neither   the  first, nor  the  only   punitive  step  that  has  been  taken  by  CCM;  it  is  merely  a  continuation  of  the ‘struggle’ in  the   endless   war  against  electoral  corruption  within  the  ruling  party. In  that  respect,  it belongs  to  the  category  of  ‘unwinnable’  wars,  which  includes   the  fight  against  the  other  three  ‘people’s  enemies’  of  poverty,  ignorance,  and  disease;  against  which  every  generation  must  continue   to  fight,  to  the  best  of  its  ability;  and  hand  over  the fight  to  the  next  generation;  as  CCM’s  track  record  clearly  shows.               
        This    party’s   election  regulations  (Kanuni  za  Uchaguzi  wa  Chama)  have  always  included a  section  which  prohibits  the  use  of  money  for  the  purpose  of  seeking  votes,   in   all  its  intra-party   elections.    The  said  rules  also  prescribe  the  applicable   punishments   in  cases  of  their  being  breached.    However,   the   enforcement  of  these  rules  has  generally  been  unsatisfactory;  as  many  of  culprits  have  escaped  punishment.
            Similar  efforts  have  been  invested  in  respect  of  national elections (the  parliamentary  and  Local  Authority  elections;  in  which   the  relevant  election  laws  have  made  appropriate   provisions  for  controlling   electoral  corruption.     But,  as  we  have  already  seen  above,  a  breach  of  such  laws  can  only  be  determined,  and  punished,   by  the  courts  of  competent  jurisdiction.   These  laws  have  been  effectively  administered,  as  evidenced  by  the  number  of  past  election  petitions  relating  to  parliamentary  elections  that  have  been  successful.             
        Even  under   the  ‘one-party’  constitutional  dispensation,  there  was  the  case  of  William  Bakari  and  another v  Chediel  Yohana  Mgonja  (Civil  case  no.  5  of  1982);  in  which  allegations  of  corruption  were  raised  against  the  said  Chediel  Mgonja,  who  had  won  the  election. The   petitioner  was   successful,  resulting  in  the  nullification  of   that  election. 
        There  are numerous  other  examples  of  election  petitions  whose  pleadings  included  allegations  of  corrupt  practices,   in  practically  each  of   the  elections  that  were  held  during  that  period;  which  confirms  the  observation  that  the  electoral  corruption  problem  has  been  with  us   all  the  time.     
        Corruption  is  a  worldwide  problem.
We  posited  above,  that  corruption  has  been  with  us  ‘all  the  time’.   But  it  has  not  been  with  us  alone,  for  it  is  a  worldwide  problem,  which  afflicts  almost  every  country  around  the  globe.  For  example,  the  records  show  that  in  Italy,  a  Socialist  party  official  was  arrested   in  Milan  in  1992,  having  been  caught  pocketing  a  bribe  on  a  cleaning  contract  in  an  old  peoples  home;  an  event  which  set  in  motion  an  anti-corruption  avalance,   which  quickly  swept  away  Italy’s  veteran  political  leaders.  And  in  Japan,   a  1989  corruption  scandal    led  to  the  downfall  of  that  country’  hitherto  most  powerful   Liberal  Democratic   Party.
piomsekwa@gmail.com/075767576.  
Source: Daily News. Thursday.

No comments: