Magufulification: Concept That Will Define Africa's Future and the Man Who Makes Things Happen

Magufulification: Concept That Will Define Africa's Future and the Man Who Makes Things Happen

Thursday, 16 September 2021

THE BUJORA CULTURAL FESTIVAL : A RENAISSANCE OF TRAIBAL CHIEFS’s INFLUENCE ?

     

 On  7th  and  8th  September,  2021,   a  mammoth  two-day  cultural   festival   was  held  at  Bujora  Sukuma  cultural  center,  Magu  District ,  in  Mwanza  Region.  The   final  day  of  this  festival  was    a   special  “royal”  day,  set  aside  for  the  official ‘ investiture’  of  President  Samia  Suluhu  Hassan,  as  the   “Chief  of  all  the  chiefs”   of  Tanzania.  President  Samia   was  also  given  a  new  Sukuma  title  of  “ Hangaya”  (the  shining  star).                      
         I   and  my  wife Anna  were  among  the  large  number  of  invitees;   but  we  were  granted  the  extra  privilege   of  being   allocated  a  reserved  seat  in  the  “Royal  Box”,  immediately   behind  President  Samia’s   ‘high  table’.      
        For  all  intents  and  purposed,  this   was  a  “royal”  event;    in  the  sense that  it  was  organized,  and  presided  over,   by   Umoja   wa  Machifu  Tanzania (UMT),  in  cooperation  with  the  Ministry  responsible  for  culture;   and  was  attended  by   the  Chiefs  from  all   the  Regions  in  Mainland  Tanzania;  plus  many  other  invited  guests  from  all  the  Regions  surrounding  Lake  Victoria (Kanda  ya  Ziwa),  including  fifty  “elders”  representing   each  and  every  District   in  the  whole  of  this  Zone.  
        Bujora  is  a  long  established  cultural  center  for  the  Wasukuma  tribe.  Thus,  presumably  because    President  Samia’s   cultural  investiture  ceremony  was  held  at  this  Sukuma historical  location,  all  the    proceedings  were conducted  in  the  Kisukuma  language,  with  a  helpful  Kiswahili  translation  being  mad,  for  the  benefit  of  the  non-Sukuma   President,  and  the   rest   of  us  in  that huge  inter-tribal  audience.    It  is  presumably  in  order to  obliterate  this  deceptive  appearance  of  a  Wasukuma  cultural   dominance,  that  President  Samia,  in  her  acceptance  speech,  directed  that   these  annual  festivals  shall  be  rotated   annually  around  all  the  regions  of  Mainland  Tanzania.
        But  the  main  event   speeches preceding  the  investiture  ceremony  were  delivered  in  Kiswahili.    The  opening  speech  was  delivered   by  the  Umoja  wa  Machifu ‘s   Executive  Secretary,  Chief   Aaron   Mikomangwa;   whose  main  thrust  was  to  ask  for  Government’s  official  recognition  of  their  Union,  plus   infrastructure  support  for  their  various   cultural   activities.  In   her   response,  President  Samia   promised that  her  government  will  give   active  consideration  to  their  requests.                                                                                  
        That   colourful   event  can  fairly   only   be  described  as  a  huge  success,  which  was  professionally    planned,  and  brilliantly  executed,  and  totally  befitting  the  installation  of   “Hangaya  Mayo  Chifu   Samia   Suluhu  Hassan”,   to  the  cultural  throne  of  “Chifu  wa  Machifu”   wote  wa  Tanzania.                                                                      
        In   the  light  of   all  this  ‘royal’   pomp  and  ceremony,  and  the  contents  of  the  speeches  made  thereat,  one  of  the  “elders”  who  was  present  there  and   a  former  Minister  in   the  government  of  President  Jakaya   Kikwete;   subsequently  asked  me,  whether  this  was  “a  renaissance  of  the   tribal  Chiefs’  former   influence  in  the  management  of  the  country’s  affairs,  which,  for  the  sake  of  consolidating  national  unity,  had  effectively  been  brought  to  an  end  by  the  father  of  the  nation,  President  Nyerere ?”                                               
         He  was  making  reference  to  the  action  taken  by  President  Nyerere  in  the  early  1960s, when  he  terminated   the  governmental   role  which  was  being  played   by  the   Chiefs  in  the  country’s  Administration  during  the  colonial  days.  He   then  sought  my  ‘candid’  opinion  on  the  matter.                  
         I  found  sufficient   time  to  sit down  with  him  and  go  through  my  recollections  of  what happened  in  1963;  when  the   Tanganyika  National  Assembly  passed  a   Government  Bill  to  repeal  the  colonial  “Chiefs’  Ordinance”.                      
But  this   private  conversation  gave  me  the  idea,  that  there  might  be  other  people  who  have  similar  inquiries  in  their  minds,  and  would  therefore  benefit  from  this   information.   And  that  is  when  I  decided  to  make  it  the  subject of  today’s  article.
The   Chiefs’  positive  role  in  the  struggle  for  independence.
   For  the  purpose  of   facilitating  the  reader’s   proper appreciation of  this  story,  a  little  background  information  would  be  helpful,  in  order  to  clear  any  misconceptions  that  President  Nyerere  might,  perhaps,  have  had  a  personal  dislike  for  the  tribal  Chiefs.    That,   is  certainly  not  the  case.                    
          In  fact,   Mwalimu   Nyerere  appears  to  have  fully  appreciated  the  positive   contribution  made  by  the  Chiefs  of  Tanganyika  in  the  political  struggle  for  the  country’s   independence.                                                                                                                                                       For  example,  after  the  second  round  of  the  1958/59  first  general  election  in  Tanganyika,  the  Governor,  in  his  opening Address to   the newly  partially  elected   Legislative  Council  in  March  1959,   announced  the  colonial  Administration’s  proposals  for Tanganyika’s   constitutional  advance  thereafter, which  included  the   establishment  of  a  ‘Council  of Ministers”  of  twelve  Members,  five  of  whom  would  be  appointed  from  the  newly  elected  members  of  the  Legislative  Council, consisting  of  three  Africans,  one  European   and  one  Asian.                                                                                          In  the subsequent   Council’s  debate on  the  “Address  in  Reply”  on  19th  March,  1959;    Mwalimu  Nyerere  made  reference   to  the  positive  role  of  the  Chiefs,   in  the  following  terms:-  “We  have  one  strong  nationalist  movement  which  is  backed  up  by  all   tribes  in  the  country,  and  backed  up  by  the  chiefs  . . . Some  people  were  doubting  about  this  unity  among   our  people  and   their Chefs,   until  a  few  days  ago,   when  the  Chiefs  themselves  had  to  put  that  in  writing.  Then  the  doubting  Thomases  said  : it  is  true  after  all,  the Chiefs  and  the  people  are  united”.                                                                                            
Of   Chiefs  and  tribes.
        It  is  on  record  (see    A  Biography  of  Julius  Nyerere, Volume  1, pages  14 – 16;   Mkuki  and  Nyota  Publishers,  Dar es Salaam,  2020),   that  “the  creation  of “tribes”  and  the  imposition  of  “chiefs”,  was  a  form  of  social  engineering  imposed  on  the  people,  for  the  convenience  of  the  colonizers”.  And   further  that   “as  was with tribes,  so  too  were  their  Chiefs,  who  were  similarly  constructed  in  some  African  communities .  .  . The   organization   under  ‘chiefdoms’  was  rare  in  most  of  Tanganyika.   It  is  the  Germans  who  first  began  to  impose  Chiefs  where  none  had  existed, by   granting  certain  individuals  powers  over  land  and  some  decision  making  on  community  matters”.                                       
        “The  British  continued  this  practice  of  imposing  Chiefs  which  was   began  by  the  Germans, in  order   to  facilitate  the  implementation  of  their  doctrine  of  “indirect  rule”.         “The  Zanaki  Chieftaincy  was  one  of  the  many  created  by  the  colonizers.  In  a  1937  report  in  the  Musoma  District  Book,  the  British  colonial  officer  at  the  time,  concedes  that  the  tribes  of  that  area  had  no  Chiefs.  There  was  not  even  the  word  ‘chief’  in  their  tribal  languages. Chiefs    had   to    be  imported   later  from  other  areas”.   
        However,  the   institution  of  Chiefs   in  Ukerewe  provides  a  different  story.  Oral  history  informs  that   the first  Musilanga  Chief,  Omukama  KATOBAHA,   came  to  Ukerewe  from   Ihangiro,  in  Bukoba.   He  reigned  over  Ukerewe  starting   from  1635 to  1655;  a  very  long  time  before  the  first   colonialists  came  to  this  country.                                         
    Omukama   KATOBAHA   was  succeeded   by  a  long  list  of  other  Wasilanga   Chiefs: KASEZA  (1635 – 1680);   KATOBAHA  II,  (1680 – 1705;    MIHIGO  (1705 – 1730);  KAHANA (1730 – 1755);  MUMANZA (1755 – 1760);  NAGO (1760 -1770);  KAHANA II  (1770 – 1780);   MIHIGO  II (1780 – 1820);   KATOBAHA  III  (1820 – 1825);  GOLITA  (1825 – 1827;  RUHINDA  (1827 – 1828);                                                        IBANDA  (1828 – 1855);  MACHUNDA (1855 – 1869);   LUKONGE (1869 – 1895);  MUKAKA (1895 – 1907);  RUHUMBIKA  (1907 – 1938);  LUKUMBUZYA (1938 – 1963)  and  the  current  KASEZA II  (1982 – date).  
        These  are  the   Wasilanga  Chiefs   who  reigned    over  Ukerewe  Chiefs  successively,  until  the time  when  the  Chiefs’  repeal  Ordinance was  enacted  in  1963.  But  since  the  Chiefs’  repeal  Ordinance  did  not  abolish  their   traditional  cultural  status  and  functions,  Ukerewe  was  able  to  install Lukumbuzya’s  eldest   son,  Vianey  Kaseza  Katobaha,  to  the  Wasilanga  throne.
        But  the  Musoma  District  Book  continues  as  follows:- “The  manufacture  of  tribalism  and  the  ideology of  tribalism  in  Africa,  is  an  aspect  which  is  often  hidden  in  current  historical  accounts,  which  present  those  rigid  tribal  classifications  as  if  they  had  always  existed  for  all  African  people  .  .  .  However,  the  authority  bestowed on  the  Chiefs  enabling   them  to  raise  funds  through  collecting  taxes  and  various  other  kinds  of  levy,    provided  plenty  of  room  for  augmenting  their  salaries  through  underhand  methods .   
“It  has  been  suggested  that  the  ‘lack  of  mourning’  for  the  passing  away  of  the  chieftaincy,  demonstrates  the  tenuous  hold  that  that  institution  had  had  on  the  social  and  political  life  of  the  nation”.
        But   Mwalimu  Nyerere  is   also  known  to   have   given    his   full   personal  support  and  cooperation  to  his   own   Wazanaki   tribal   Chief,  even  after  the  abolition  of  the  said   Chiefs’  Ordinance.   Thus,  in  view  of  such    disclosures,  he  cannot  be  fairly   suspected  of  having   harboured   any  personal  collective  dislike  for  the  Chiefs. Clearly  therefore,  there  must  have  been   other  cogent  reasons, which  account  for  Nyerere’s  action  of   repealing   the  colonial  chiefs’  Ordinance,  and  also  for  the  “lack  of  mourning  at  the  passing  away  of  Chieftaincy”  quoted  above.   Some  of  these  reasons  are   discussed  in  the  paragraphs  which  follow   below.
The  background   to  the abolition  of  the  colonial  Chiefs’  Ordinance.
The  background  to  that  story,   is  that  during  the  period immediately   following  the  achievement  of  independence,  Mwalimu  Nyerere  was  faced  with  certain  major  tasks,  all  of  which  were  absolutely   monumental  and  daunting,   both in  their  scope  and  coverage.                                                           These  included:                                                                              
(i)  The  dismantling  of  the  legal  and  administrative  governance   structures  that  had  been  left  behind  by  the  colonial  Administration;  with  priority  being  given  to   those  structures  that  were  obstructive  to  the  achievement  and  sustenance  of  national  unity;                 
 (ii)   The  rapid   establishment  of  new  and    appropriate  replacement  structures;  a   process  involving   the  amendment,  or  repeal,   of  any  undesirable  colonial  legislation;            
   (iii)  The  putting  in  place  of  appropriate   new  structures  and  policies.                         
        All   such  matters  required   approval  by  the  Legislature.  And   because  I  had  just  been   appointed    Clerk  of  the  National  Assembly,  I  became  closely  involved  in  all  these  processes.    In  most  cases,   the  Government  had  to  resort   to  the  rule   which  permits  the  introduction  of  a  government  Bill  in  the  National  Assembly   under “certificate  of  urgency”;  in  order  to  complete  the  dismantling  process  in  the  shortest  possible  time.                
        Among  the  pieces  of  legislation  which  were   speedily  dealt  with,  was  the  repeal  of  the said    Chiefs’  Ordinance, simply   because  it  presented  a  potential  obstacle  to  the  achievement  of  national  unity.   The  others  were  the  Land  Tenure  Ordinance,  and  the    Magistrates’  Courts  Ordinance,  because  of  their   repulsive  racial   discriminatory  bias.
The  Chiefs  Ordinance  was  a  hindrance  to  the  achievement  of  national  unity  because it  created  multiple  loyalties  among  the  people  of  this  new  nation,  with  each  tribe  owing loyalty  and  allegiance  to  its  own  tribal  Chief,  plus  regarding  the  other  tribes  virtually   as  ‘foreigners’;  which  was  a  very  unhealthy  situation  for  the achievement  of  national unity  and  loyalty  to  the  national  leadership.  
T        he  legislative    process  for  the  passage  of  the  Chiefs’  Abolition  Bill  also  presented  a  kind  of  record,    in  the  sense  that,  by  prior  arrangement,   it  was  so   fast-tracked  that  it  received  the requisite  Presidential  Assent  on  the  same  day  of  its  adoption  by  the  National  Assembly.
        The   substance  of   the  repeal   statute.
The   Chiefs’  Ordinance  repeal  statute,  actually    did  not  abolish  the  traditional   cultural   functions  of  Tanzania’s    Chiefs.   All  that  this  statute  did,  was  to  remove  from  them  only  their    Administrative powers  (which  allowed  them  to preside  over  their  respective  rural  ‘Native  Authority’  Councils);   as  well  as   their  judicial  powers  (which  had   allowed  them  to  function  as  Magistrates  in  what  were  known  as  Native  Authority  law  Courts).   But   these   were   only   in   addition   to   their  formal  tribal   cultural  duties  and  functions.    
        However,  in  addition  to  the  “elder” referred  to  above,   who  expressed  his  anxiety  regarding  the  possibility  of   a  “renaissance  of  tribalism”  following  on   what  transpired  at  the  Bujora  ‘investiture   ceremony’;   some more   voices  have  also   been  heard  expressing  similar   fears.  That  is   a  serious  enough  matter  which  prompted  the  CCM  spokesman  to   issue  a  clarification,  in  a prepared  public  statement.  
It   thus   appears  necessary  for  me   to   emphasize  the  point,  that  the   Chiefs’  abolition  statute,  did  not   abolish  the  traditional  cultural  functions  of  these  Chiefs.               
         However,  in  the  case  of  my  own  Ukerewe  District,   as  indeed   was  the  case  in  many  other  areas,  the  institution  of  Chieftaincy  was  not  imposed  on  the  community by  the  colonialist  like   in   some  other  areas.    But  that  fact  notwithstanding, even  though  the  ‘royal  drum”  was,  according  to  tradition,  inherited  by  his  eldest  son  upon  Chief  Michael  Lukumbuzya’s  death  in  1982;   the  formal  Kerebe  cultural  customs  have  largely  disappeared  from  practice,  as  the  Chief  himself  does  not  even  live  in  Ukerewe.  And  this  is   what  explains  the  conspicuous   absence  of  the  Chief  of  Ukerewe  from  the  Bujora  cultural  festival. 
 piomsekwa@gmail.com   /0754767576
Source: Daily News today.

No comments: