Epistle to Afrophobic South Africa

Epistle to Afrophobic South Africa

Thursday, 1 September 2022

Fond memories of the late Augustino Lyatonga Mrema


The  Holy  Bible says  this  about  “death”  in  the  Old  Testament,  (Ecclesiastes, 9:11)   “whatsoever     thy  hand  findeth  to  do,  do  it  with  all  thy  might;  for  there  is  no   work,  nor  device,  nor  knowledge,  nor  wisdom,  in  the  grave  where  thou  goest”.    
        The  late  former  Minister,  Hon.  Augustino  Lyatonga  Mrema,  Member of Parliament, who    died   in  the  early  hours  on  the  morning  on  21st  August,  2022;  was  the  kind  of  person   who  dispatched  his  responsibilities  “with  all  his  might”.
He  was  a  political  maverick,  whose  political  roller  coaster  record   includes  his  having  held,  among  others,   the  powerful position  of  Minister  for Home  Affairs in  1990, in  which  he  ‘hit  the  ground  running’  by  spearheading   a  successful  crackdown  on  all  sorts  of  wrongdoers;  and  this,  apparently,  is  what   earned  him  the  unprecedented   elevation,   in  1992,   to   the  specially  created  new  position   of  ‘Deputy  Prime  Minister’ (that  was  not  provided  for in  the  constitution);  which  was  done    presumably  in  order  to  give  him  ‘more  teeth’,  while  retaining  his  Home  Affairs  docket.                                                                           The  Augustino  Lyatonga  Mrema  whom   I  knew
I  first  got the  opportunity  to  work  closely  with  the  late  Augustino  Mrema  soon  after  the  1990  general  election,  which  brought  both  of  us  into  Parliament;   wherein  he  was  elected  to  represent  the  Moshi   Rural   constituency;  and  I  was  elected  to  represent  Ukerewe  Constituency.    As   a  result  of  which,  Mrema   was  appointed  Minister  for  Home  Affairs;  and  I  was  elected  Deputy  Speaker.  
         Hon.  Mrema’s   first  term  in  Parliament  was   generally  uneventful,  in  the   sense  that  there  was  nothing  spectacular,  or  perhaps  unusual,   in  the   performance   of  his  duties.    But  during  the  leadership  period  which  followed  immediately  thereafter,   he  was  made  to   suffer  the  punishment   of  being    suspended  from  the  service  of  Parliament   for  forty  days,  as  will  be  explained  below.                          
        As  this  was  the   first  time  ever  in  the  history  of  the  Tanzania  Parliament,  for   such  punitive  action  had  been   taken  by  Parliament  against  one  of  its  member;   inquisitive  questions  were  therefore  raised  by  interested  observers,  who  were  wondering  whether,  in  fact,  Parliament  had  the  legal   power  to  do  so.           At  that   material  time,  I  was  the  Speaker  of  the  House,  and  I  felt  obliged  to  give  a  public  explanation  in  defense  of  this  unusual   action  by Parliament;   which  I  did   in  a  special  article  that  was  published  in  the  then  circulating  journal  titled  “BUNGE  NEWS;   as  well  as in   the  most widely  circulating  newspaper  at  that  time,  the   DAILY NEWS.  But   because  of   this  column’s   editorial  space  limitations,  I  can   only  provide   an  abbreviated  version   of  the  vast  information  contained  therein.
The  relevant   event,  and  the  circumstances  surrounding  it.
As  already stated  above,  Hon  Augustino  Lyatonga  Mrema  was,  at  the  relevant  time,   a   Member  of  Parliament  for  the  Temeke  constituency  in  Dar  es  Salaam.   He  was  suspended  from  the  service  of  the  House  for  a  total  of  40  days;  for  the  reason  that  he   had  failed  to  produce  convincing   evidence  to  substantiate  some  serious  allegations  which  he  had  made  on  the  floor  of  the  House,   that  “there  was  a  plot  to  kill  him”  which,  he  alleged,  “had  been  hatched  at a  meeting  of  unnamed  senior  government  officials  held  on  4th  April  1996”;  and  had  continued  to  say  that  “three  specified  persons,  including  himself,  were   to  be  assassinated  before  the  2000  general  election;  and  that  one  of  them,  retired  Army  General.  Imran  Kombe   had  already  been  killed  by  the   Police,  in  implementation  of  that  evil  scheme  of  causing  death  by  assassination”.          In  view  of  the  serious  nature  of  these  allegations,   on  a  motion  moved  by  Prime  Minister  Fredrick  Sumaye,    Mrema  was  ordered  to   produce  relevant  documents  which  would  substantiate  them,  and  was  given  a   period   of  five  days  within  which   to  assemble  and  present    his  evidence.
        Hon.  Mrema   dutifully   complied  with  this  Order,  and  presented  to  the  House    the  documents  on  which  he  was  seeking  to   rely   as  his  evidence,  on  the  due  date.    In  accordance  with  the  Rules  of  Parliamentary  procedure,   adequate  time  was  allocated  for  the  debate  on  the  matter  to  take  place,    which  would  determine  whether,  or  not,  these  documents   provided  convincing  evidence  to  substantiate  his  allegations.   At   the  end  of  this   debate,   the  House  voted,  and  unanimously   decided  that  the  said  documents   did  not  produce  convincing  evidence.   Consequently, another motion  was  moved  for  Hon.  Mrema’s  immediate  suspension  from  the  service  of  the  House,   for  the  remainder  of  the  Budget  session  that   was  then  in  progress,  which  was  a  total  of  forty  days.      
Augustino  Mrema  goes  to  court.
However,  the  matter  did  not  end  there,  because  veteran  politician   Mrema  would  not  take  that  punishment  ‘lying  down’.   He  was  ordinarily   a  man  of   strong  will   and  determination,  and  a  man  of  action.    So  he  decided  to  go  to  court  to  challenge  the  legality  of   this   relatively  minor  punishment.   I  call  it  ‘minor’  simply  because,  under  the  circumstances,  he  could  have  easily   qualified   for  a  much  more  severe  punishment;  in  view  of  the  fact  that   Parliament  has    other  alternative  options,  which  it  could  have  adopted   in  order  to  punish  him  for  the  said  offence.   The  law  of  Parliament  vests  on  all  Parliaments,   the  power  of  penal  jurisdiction.  Thus,  Parliament  has  the  power  to punish  persons  who  commit  offences  within  its  walls.          
            For  example, in  Hon  Mrema’s  case,    alternative  action  could  have  been  taken  by  relying  on  the  British  House  of  Commons    precedent,   whereby,  in  1948,  Hon.  Mr,  Garry   Allighan,  MP,   a  member  of  the  Labour  party  (which  was  the  ruling  party  at  the  material  time),  had  lied  to   a  Parliamentary   committee  meeting,  when   he  accused  his  fellow  MPs   of  having  accepted  money  “for  disclosing  to  the  Press  the  proceedings  of  his  Parliamentary  party  caucus”,  when,  in  fact,   he  himself  had  done  exactly  the  same.     Thus,   in  response  thereto,  the  Leader  of  government  business  in  the  House  moved  a  motion,   proposing  that  Hon.  Allighan  be suspended  from  the  service  of  the House  for  six  months,   without  pay.     But   another   Member  moved  an  amendment  proposing  that  Hon.  Allighan  be  expelled   from  the  House,  which  was  a  more  severe  punishment,  and  which  was  unanimously  carried,  and  the  offending  member  was  duly  expelled.                                                                                 
          Another   alternative is  the  use  of   the    applicable   statutory  provisions. For  example,   section  12(3)  of  the  Parliamentary  Immunities, Powers  and    Privileges  Act,  provides  as  follows:-                  “the  Assembly  or,  as  the  case  may  be,   a  committee  thereof   may,  in  relation  to  any  act,  recommend  to  the  Speaker  that  he  requests  the  Attorney  General  to  take  steps  necessary  to  bring  to  trial  before  a  court  of  competent  jurisdiction,  any  person  connected  with  an  offence  under  this  Act”.                                                                
         There  is  also  was  the  alternative  provided  by  the  Penal  Code,  whose  section  26  provides  that  “any  proceedings  before  the  National  Assembly  or  Committee  thereof,  in  which  any  person  gives  evidence  or  produces  any   document,  shall  be  deemed  to  be  judicial  proceedings  for  the  purposes  of  sections,  106, 108  and  109”.   Section 102  of  that  Act  provides  that  “any  person,  in  any  judicial  proceeding   knowingly  gives false  testimony  touching  on  any  matter  in  that  proceeding,  is  guilty  of  a  misdemeanor  termed  perjury”;   whose  penalty  is  “imprisonment  for  seven  years”.                                                                                                                              
        Hence,  in  view  of  all these  alternatives  which  were  available  to  the  House,  one  can  say  that  Hon  Mrema  was  hugely  lucky,  to  have  escaped  a  more  severe  punishment.   For  instance,                  had  the  House  opted  to  direct   the  Attorney  General  to “bring  him  to  trial  in  a  court  of  competent  jurisdiction”   under  the  Parliamentary  Powers,  Immunities  and  Privileges  Act;  a  similar  conviction  would  have  qualified  him  for  the  stipulated  seven  years   behind  bars !
Augustino  Mrema  in  the  High  Court.
        Hon.   Mrema’s  High  Court  petition eventually  was  dismissed.  But  it  reminded   me   of   Shakespeare’s  words   which  appear   in  his  Troilus  and  Cressida,  Act  111,  scene 2,  in which   Achilles  said  to  Patrloculus:-   “I  see  my  reputation  at  stake.  My fame is shrewdly gored”.     Mrema  must  have  realized  that  “his  reputation  was  at  stake,  and  his  fame  would  be  shrewdly  gored”  if  he  did  nothing  about  it.  Hence,   understandably,  he     went  to  court,  presumably   in  order  to  salvage  his  reputation  and  fame.
        In  his  court    pleadings,   Mrema   contended  that  his  suspension  for  40  days  was  invalid  because,   he  claimed,   “it  does  not  comply  with  the  Parliamentary  Standing  Order   which  states   that   for  a  first  offender  like  him,  the  suspension  should  have  been  for  only  five  days”.   He  also  quoted  some    other  Standing  Orders,  which  he  claimed  had  been  violated.                                                                           But  these  matters  were  not  subjected   to  inquiry  by  the  Court,  simply  because  of  the  prohibition  imposed  by  article  100 (1)   of  the  Constitution  of  the  United  Republic,  1977;  namely,  that   the  proceedings  of  Parliament  “shall  not  be  questioned  in  any  court,  or  any  other  p-lace  outside  Parliament  itself”;   was  also  the  reason  for  the  failure  of  his  petition.  The  Presiding  Judge  Katiti   said:    “In  obedience  to  article  101(1)  of  the  Constitution  of  the  United  Republic,  I  hereby  declare  that  this   court  has  no  jurisdiction  to  hear  this  petition”.   
        Thus,  any  Member  of  Parliament,  is  subject  only  to  disciplinary  action  taken  by  the  House  itself.    This  is  confirmed  by  the  Canadian  case  of  Bradlaugh  v  Gosselt (1884),  12 QBD 271;  in  which   the  Order  of  the  Canadian  House  to  suspend  its  member,  Hon  Bradlaygh  from  the  service  of  the  House,  was  challenged  in  court;  but  which  held  that  “the  jurisdiction  of  the  House  over  their  own  members,  and  the  right  to  impose  discipline  within  its  walls,  is  absolute  and  exclusive”.   
A  quick  look  at  the  general  power  of  Parliament  to  punish  its  members.
It  has  been  authoritatively  said,  that  “laws  are  meaningless  unless  there  is  power  to  enforce  them  by  imposing  penalties  on those  who  break  them”;   to  which    Professor  Thomas  of  Syracuse  University  aptly  added:   ”if  he  who  beaks  the  law  is  not  punished,  he  who  obeys  it  is  cheated”.   We  have  already  stated  above,  that  in  addition  to  relying  on  the  courts,  Parliament  is  also  vested  with  its  own  penal  jurisdiction.   
        There  are  two  forms  of  punishment  which  can  be  inflicted  on  MPs  who  commit  offences  in  the  House:-   One  is  expulsion  from  the  House;  which  effectively   terminates  his  membership  of  Parliament;  and   this   is  the  ultimate  sanction  against  an  MP,   which,   essentially  is  more   than     mere  punishment.
         The  other  is  suspension  from  the  service  of  the  House  for  a   specified  period;  which is  usually  imposed  as  a  mild  disciplinary  measure.
        There  are  numerous  examples  of  the  exercise  of  this  power  by  Parliament  around  the Commonwealth.  In  the  said  article,  I  presented  examples  from  the  other  Commonwealth  Parliaments  of   Canada,  which  has  power  to  even   commit  persons  to  prison;    Grenada,  where  a  Member  was  suspended  from  the  service  of  the  House  for  a  month;   New  South  Wales  Australia  where  the  Minister  of  Finance  was  suspended  from the  House  for  the  remainder  of  the  day’s  sitting;  because  of  his  failure  to  comply  with  an  order  by  the  House  requiring  him  to  table  certain   Papers  which were  held  by  the  government;  and  Zambia;  where  a  journalist  was  committed  to  prison  for  publishing  articles  “which  exposed  Parliament  to  public   ridicule”. This  is  only  a  part  of  the   long  story  of    Augustino  Lyatonga  Mrema  as  a    Member  of   the  Tanzania  Parliament.  May  his  soul  rest  in  eternal  peace.   Amen.
piomsekwa@gmail.com   /  0754767576.
Source: Daily News & Cde Msekwa today.

No comments: